Victory Archery XBolt Arrows Review

We recently had the opportunity to try out Victory Archery’s XBolt arrows to see how they shot. For starters, here are the specifics on the arrows we tested:

  • Length: 20”
  • Material: Carbon
  • Straightness: +/- 0.003”
  • Spine: 20F
  • Point: 100 grain Field Point

The arrows came packaged in a convenient 6-pack that didn’t seem any worse for wear from shipping through the mail. Once you remove them from the box, plan on putting them in a quiver as getting them back into the box is quite the exercise!

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Materials and Design

The arrows we received for testing arrived already fletched and with nocks and brass inserts already in place. We gave each a close inspection and found all vanes were well attached. We also gave a close visual inspection of each nock and insert and found everything to be straight and well mounted. This may seem a bit far to go, but we have seen arrows in the past (from other manufacturers) that arrived with a loose nock or insert, or even a torn/loose vane.

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Weight Consistency

We weighed each of the six arrows a total of three times per arrow and averaged the three weights for each arrow. We used a 100-grain field point to give us a total weight for the arrow as it would be fired. To ensure consistency, we actually changed out the field point so the same point was used for each arrow. The average weights of the six arrows were 425.2, 423.6, 426.4, 424.5, 425.1 and 424.9 grains. This essentially means a weight variance of only 2.8 grains between all six arrows…certainly not enough to ever worry about affecting your shot! Using our ProChrono Chronograph, we found all six arrows flew within just a couple of FPS of each other ranging from 322 to 324 FPS consistently.

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Accuracy

Once we had all of the data on the Victory Arrows, we took them to the range to test the single most important facet of any arrow…accuracy. Now don’t get us wrong, we fully understand there are many important aspects of an arrow, including durability, spine strength, etc., but let’s face it, if an arrow doesn’t shoot straight, then none of those factors really matter. You can have an arrow that is capable of penetrating the armor on a main battle tank, but if you can’t hit the tank, what good is it?

To eliminate the inconsistency of our shooter (yes, that would be me…I can admit there might be a little movement every once in a while…) we set up our crossbow on our trusty FieldPod. We took a few shots to check speed and ensure we were properly sighted in and then fired 4 final shots into the target. Each shot was fired from a range of 30 yards and at a different bullseye on the target (we do NOT recommend trying to group your shots as damage to your arrow(s) can be a real issue given the accuracy of modern crossbows…especially from a static shooting rest). We found the arrows to be extremely accurate, each hitting within ½” of the center of the bullseye.

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Overall Thoughts

We found the Victory arrows to be very consistent in both weight as well as in shooting characteristics. These arrows stood up to repeated shots without any damage to the arrow, nor any loosening of nocks or inserts. The vanes also stayed perfectly intact and provided for many well placed arrows. These are reasonably priced and a great value for the money. These would certainly be a set of arrows we would be confident to have in our quiver during hunting season!

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